When speaking with a seller about a pre-listing home inspection, many times you get push-back: “Why,” they ask, “doesn’t the buyer pay for it?” Yes, the buyer does pay for the home inspection after their offer is accepted. However, by then, it may be too late. When problems with the home remain unknown until the buyer’s inspection, it puts the seller at risk of losing the sale or having to accept a much lower price.

Whether it is a new or older home, having a pre-home inspection should be a MUST, not a maybe. Does this mean the seller has to fix everything found on the inspection report? No, it only puts the seller in the position of choosing those items they are willing to fix, or not fix; the seller may choose to credit the buyer some repairs at closing as part of the negotiation. The main goal of the pre-listing home inspection is for the seller to be aware of the actual state of the home, and not get caught by surprise.

Here are four inspection items that could potentially put your sale at risk.

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